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Bibliography

U.S. Geological Survey Toxic Substances Hydrology Program--Proceedings of the Technical Meeting, Colorado Springs, Colorado, September 20-24, 1993, Water-Resources Investigations Report 94-4015

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Spatial Variability of Soil Properties Affecting Chemical Transport at the Plains, Georgia, Research Site

by

R. K. Hubbard (U.S.Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Southeast Watershed Research Laboratory, P.O. Box 946, Tifton, GA 31793), D. D. Bosch (U.S.Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Southeast Watershed Research Laboratory, P.O. Box 946, Tifton, GA 31793), R. A. Leonard (U.S.Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Southeast Watershed Research Laboratory, P.O. Box 946, Tifton, GA 31793), and D. W. Hicks (U.S. Geological Survey, 3039 Amwiler Road, Atlanta, GA 30360-2824)

Abstract

A study was conducted on a 0.81-ha site near Plains, Georgia, to determine transport rates of water and applied agricultural chemicals to ground water in a recharge area of the Coastal Plain. As part of the study, soil cores were collected from the root and vadose zone to a depth of 914 cm (30 ft). Cores were collected from 12 locations within the site to determine spatial variability of the soil physical properties. Measurements on core samples were made of particle size distribution, vertical saturated hydraulic conductivity, bulk density, and soil moisture retention. Measured soil moisture retention was compared with soil moisture retention predicted from equations based on particle size distribution and bulk density. Analyses of the soil samples showed that the physical properties varied both vertically and laterally. The soil has a sandy texture at the surface, has increased clay content from 91 to 366 cm (3 to 12 ft) deep, and then is very sandy to a depth of 914 cm (30 ft). Laterally, the plot varies in clay content in the 91 to 366 cm (3 to 12 ft) depth interval from the east to the west side, with the northeastern corner having the highest clay content. Lower vertical saturated hydraulic conductivities and higher soil-moisture retention and bulk densities are associated with increasing clay content. The comparisons between measured and predicted volumetric-water content show that the equations adequately predict the relative magnitude of the volumetric-water content, but that absolute predictions lack precision.

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