USGS - science for a changing world

Environmental Health - Toxic Substances

Photo Gallery

Processes that Control the Natural Attenuation of Chlorinated Solvents--Wurtsmith Air Force Base, Oscoda, Michigan

USGS scientists sampling at a multi-level well
Wintertime sampling at a multi-level well used to monitor vertical biogeochemical gradients in a naturally degrading plume of chlorinated solvents in the subsurface.

A technician is pumping water from a multi-level well
A technician is pumping water from a multi-level well during an investigation of the natural attenuation of a chlorinated solvent plume under a fire training pit. Tubing from the well leads to an in-line multi-parameter probe that records pH, dissolved oxygen, Eh, and temperature. Photo credit: Sheridan K. Haack, USGS.

A technician is collecting water-quality samples from a multi-level well
A technician is collecting water-quality samples from a multi-level well. The samples were analyzed for chemical constituents that are indicators of natural attenuation processes.

Extracting DNA from aquifer samples in preparation for polymerase chain reaction analysis
Extracting DNA from aquifer samples in preparation for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of microbial DNA structure. Information on how DNA varies with location and time helps scientists understand how bacterial community structure controls the extent and effectiveness of the natural attenuation of chlorinated solvents in the subsurface.

Extracting DNA from aquifer solid samples
DNA was extracted from aquifer solids and was analyzed for patterns of microbial diversity in a plume of chlorinated solvents undergoing natural microbial biodegradation.

A bubble of gas trapped in a glass tube
Hydrogen gas in groundwater was measured using the bubble strip method. A bubble of gas was trapped in the glass tube pictured and was removed with a syringe inserted into a septum.

USGS scientists adjusting a gas cylinder
Hydrogen gas stripped from groundwater samples was measured in a building on the Wurtsmith Air Force Base using a portable hydrogen gas analyzer.

A glass gas sample bottle
Hydrogen gas in groundwater was measured using the bubble strip method. The amount of hydrogen gas in groundwater can be used to infer the types of bacteria that are actively degrading contaminants in the subsurface.

USGS scientists measuring field water-quality parameters
USGS scientists measured a variety of chemical constituents in the field, using portable test kits, in order to evaluate real-time conditions and choose appropriate sampling times.

USGS scientist operating a drill rig with hydraulic punch technology
Aquifer sediments were retrieved from up to 40 feet deep using hydraulic punch technology. DNA was extracted from the sediments to evaluate the community structure of microorganisms actively degrading contaminants in the subsurface

  

More Information

Related Photo Gallery

Back to Photo Gallery Index

USGS Home Water Land Resources Science Systems Ecosystems Energy and Minerals Environmental Health Hazards

Accessibility FOIA Privacy Policies and Notices

USA.gov logo U.S. Department of the Interior | U.S. Geological Survey
URL: toxics.usgs.gov/photo_gallery/wurtsmith.html
Page Contact Information:
Page Last Modified: Wednesday, 05-Aug-2015 11:11:59 EDT