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Development and Research: Multifunction Bedrock-Aquifer Transportable Testing Tool (BAT3)

A diagram of the BAT3 in a borehole with packers inflated to seal against the borehole.
A diagram of the BAT3 in a bedrock borehole with borehole packers inflated to seal against the borehole wall. The length of the test interval is adjusted by adding additional sections of pipe between the fluid-injection apparatus and the bottom packer. The BAT3 is lowered or raised in the borehole using steel pipe or a cable attached above the transducer shrouds.

The BAT3 supported from a truck-mounted winch.
The BAT3 supported from a truck-mounted winch as it is being prepared for installation in a borehole. Shown in the photograph are (A) inflatable packers, (B) transducer shrouds, (C) pump shroud, and (D) fluid-injection shroud. Tubing and wires (E) used to control the downhole equipment extend from the transducer shrouds.

BAT3 control equipment.
BAT3 control equipment. The pressure manifold is used for controlling inflation of packers. The flow meters measure discharge or injection rates during aquifer tests and geochemical sampling. A laptop PC is used for real-time monitoring of hydraulic head and discharge data.

A screen shot of the BAT3's software.
A screen shot of the BAT3's software used for real-time monitoring of hydraulic head and discharge rates. The software allows for the acquisition, visualization, storage, and field interpretation of aquifer test data. Because of the automated data collection, near real-time estimates of hydraulic properties of the test interval can be obtained.

The BAT3 in five shipping containers.
The BAT3 was designed to be easily transported to sites where it is needed. It comes in five shipping containers.

USGS scientists assembling the BAT3 for the investigation of fractured bedrock.
USGS scientists assembling the BAT3 for the investigation of fractured bedrock.

A USGS scientist using wrenches to assemble components of the BAT3.
A USGS scientist using wrenches to assemble components of the BAT3 before using it to collect hydraulic data from fractured bedrock.

Fully assembled BAT3 with packers spaced to straddle a fracture in a bedrock borehole.
Fully assembled BAT3 with packers (black cylinders) spaced to straddle a fracture in a bedrock borehole.

USGS scientists collecting water samples from bedrock fractures with the BAT3.
USGS scientists collecting water samples from bedrock fractures with the BAT3 at the University of Connecticut Landfill Study Area, Storrs, CT.

USGS scientists collecting water samples from discrete fractures with the BAT3.
USGS scientists collecting water samples from discrete fractures with the BAT3 at the University of Connecticut Landfill Study Area, Storrs, CT. On the table is the equipment used to control the BAT3.

Control equipment for the BAT3 was set up on a table.
Control equipment for the BAT3 was set up at the University of Connecticut Landfill Study Area, Storrs, CT.

BAT3 on plastic sheeting
Plastic sheeting is used to keep the BAT3's cables and tubing clean during setup and use, University of Connecticut Landfill Study Area, Storrs, CT.

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Page Last Modified: Thursday, 01-Aug-2013 11:19:25 EDT